Brian Mudd

Brian Mudd

There are two sides to stories and one side to facts. That's Brian's mantra and what drives him to get beyond the headlines with daily stories driven...Read More

 

Florida’s Census Shaft, Special Session & Monkeypox – May 23rd, 2022


Photo: Getty Images

Florida’s Census Shaft, Special Session & Monkeypox - Top 3 Takeaways – May 23rd, 2022 

  1. Florida’s Census shafting was significant. And just how significant was the shafting? Significant enough to have potentially resulted in a lost congressional seat and an additional Electoral College vote. Florida’s undercount has been determined to be the 4th highest in the country with about 3.5% of Florida’s population not being accounted for, for the next decade. It’s a huge deal and we weren’t alone. Overall, 14 states had highly inaccurate results, many of which were sufficient to impact congressional representation and Electoral College vote representation. Six states had significant undercounts, with eight states unjustly benefiting at the expense of those six from what are known as overcounts. The six states that were hosed with undercounts: Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Mississippi, Tennessee and Texas. The eight states that were overcounted... Delaware, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island and Utah. Notice any political trends? Five of the undercounted states, including Florida, are currently red states, while only one, Illinois is not. Six of the overcounted states are currently blue states, with only two, Ohio and Utah, that aren’t. There is no question but that the Census errors overwhelmingly are of benefit to Democrats, from the share of federal funding allocated to states, to congressional representation and Electoral College representation. It’s a big deal. Now, does this mean there’s more to the story? Was the overcounting and undercounting intentional? In general, there’s no clear evidence of it being the case. The Census shows the prominent reason for overcounts were derived from people who have homes in multiple states being counted in multiple states. Meanwhile undercounts were widely sampled among Blacks, Hispanics and Native Americans. Given the demographics of states showing both under and overcounts, that largely washes. It doesn’t make it right, but it is potentially explainable. This also should serve as a lesson for those who intentionally chose not to participate out of a form of indignance. Florida has been shafted out of our equitable share of federal resources, congressional representation and influence in the Electoral College. The big storyline once the Census dropped, was that Florida and Texas didn’t show the population growth we were believed to have had. The reality is that both states did have the population growth we were thought to have had. This shows that the current Census collection process is a bit of a farse. Just as it's illegal to vote in multiple states, it's improper to be counted in the Census in multiple states – yet this practice was pervasive. Better systems are needed to see to it that this doesn’t happen again – else the shafting for states like ours will almost certainly happen again. Speaking of broken systems which need to be fixed... 
  2. Florida’s property insurance debacle. The time for excuses is over. The days of half-baked measures are done. It’s time for Florida’s Legislature to fix the damn property insurance system. If at the end of this week Florida’s law allows homeowners to abuse the system by fraudulently filing insurance claims for routine maintenance and repairs, the special session will have been a failure. If anywhere near eight of ten property insurance lawsuits nationally are in Florida, it will have been a failure. If the scumbag attorneys (which is most of them by the way – you can generally find a good attorney by identifying one who doesn’t like most in the profession) who’ve been gleefully suing Florida’s property insurance companies with impunity aren’t screaming by the end of the week, this session will have been a failure. Florida’s property insurance market is in crisis, you know it by how much you’re having to pay for your insurance and how few options, if any you have for it. It’s obvious with 79% of the country’s property insurance lawsuits stemming from Florida which has fewer 9% of the country’s policies. It’s time to stop the madness and we’re about to find out what the legislature is made of. It was appropriate for Governor DeSantis to have called this session after the state House, due entirely because of Speaker Chris Sprowls who was an obstructionist, failed to take up the reforms passed by the Senate. But this can’t just be another piece of legislation which does “something” and takes years to potentially move the needle. Just last week, the CEO of Citizens, which is once again the largest property insurer in the state of Florida, said this: This marketplace is completely 100% out of control. Right, and you don’t fix things that are 100% completely out of control with half measures. This needs to be the week where the state of Florida turns up the heat on what’s essentially insurance fraud, by a minority of Florida’s homeowners. And it needs to be the week where the scumbag attorneys scream. That’s the only way to fix a system that’s 100% out of control. Speaking of which... 
  3. But wait there’s more... Because there already isn’t enough to worry about now there’s this. Monkeypox. Just last week the WHO confirmed an outbreak, and just yesterday President Biden said this: Everybody should be concerned about it. Ok, so yeah, back to you. That’s because, in sticking with his typical leadership effectiveness he followed up by saying this: We’re working on it. Hard to figure out what to do? Well, that inspires confidence as per usual. So, I guess we’re to just worry or something since he said we need to be concerned? Anyway, there’s enough to worry about without spending time on this one for now. But look out, because it's viral and spreads through droplets. You know what that might mean coming from this Government. So yeah, I’m not yet going to concern myself with the virus, but the government response? That’s already somewhat concerning.  

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